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Topic: Recognizing and Responding to Domestic Violence and Bullying as a Workplace Issue: The law, the signs and strategies, and the facts

Messages (1) Visitors (785)


rickey.allen
Member since 05/03/2012
Recognizing and Responding to Domestic Violence and Bullying as a Workplace Issue: The law, the signs and strategies, and the facts
05/03/2012 / 11:35 am    #1

Once you realize that:

1.approximately 1 in 5 working adults is, has been or will be a victim of domestic violence at some point in their lives,
2.the impact of domestic violence on business includes more than $1 billion in direct annual medical costs, and lost productivity equal to more than 30,000 full time jobs,
3.it is easy to see that domestic violence is an issue that HR Professionals need to be prepared to address.

In addition, in the current climate HR Professionals also need to be trained to address workplace bullying issues. As workplace stress continues to increase, it pays to be prepared.

In the session, you will learn:

the legal implications of domestic violence and bullying for your employer,
how to develop a strategy to recognize and respond to domestic violence in the workplace, and
the real facts about who commits domestic violence.

For example, in 2007, Harvard Medical School announced a national survey by researchers from the Centers for Disease Control that examined 11,000 men and women ages 18-28 and found 24% of heterosexual relationships have had violence in them, half of it reciprocal and half non-reciprocal, and women committed 71% of the non-reciprocal violence and were more likely to hit first in the reciprocal violence. Men, on the other hand, are less likely to report when they are the victims of domestic violence.




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